Monthly Archives: October 2015

C2 mold is complete

The mold is now ready, hurrah!

The plug was highly polished in preparation for making the mold. The red coating was sanded, rubbed and polished to the point where the black under layer started to appear. This was a clever way (for which I take no credit) to avoid rubbing too much in the same place and distorting the shape. (Dreadful phone picture)

Polished plug

Polished plug


The mold is made in two sections, joined down the centre with a wide flange to support vacuuming.
Mold joined down the centre

Mold joined down the centre


The boat seems narrower in the mold, this appearance may be caused by the join line though.
Rear deck

Rear deck


The combined weight of the plug and the mold is substantial.
Front deck

Front deck


The cockpit rim will be made at the same time. I’m glad I’m not the one who has to release it from the mold.
Cockpit rim

Cockpit rim


The plug will now remain in the mold for a further ten days to ensure that the fibre glass has completely gone off thus reducing the risk of distortion.

It’s like waiting for Christmas, but hopefully we’ll get the boat wet by mid-November.

More plug progress

Popped down to the boat builders last week to see the progress on the plug with my own eyes. It is very near completion except for the final polish before a mold is taken off it.

The original shape was milled on a CNC machine in polystyrene, and then covered in fibre glass. However, this is still not stable enough to maintain the shape and surface, especially as I transported it on my roof rack, plus the time it’s been dormant. Consequently it took a considerable volume of filler to ensure a smooth finish and consistent shape.

6.5 metres long

6.5 metres long


Now that is has a colour applied, it looks a lot sleeker.
Rear deck

Rear deck


A nice big rear deck surface for the Devizes to Westminster race number. The rear buoyancy bag will also but secured below deck.
The stern

The stern


The design of the stern is similar to The Darkness. The boat has zero rocker along the length which will ensure straight tracking, but may be a devil to turn around. However, there are no 180 degree turns from Devizes to Westminster.
The cockpit

The cockpit


The cockpit area seems vast, but considerably smaller than a full open boat. The cockpit rim will make a nice comfortable handle for portaging, and it will support a full size (massive!) spray deck.
Front deck

Front deck


The front deck is steeped to ensure efficient water run off if the bow goes under any large washes. Its steep angle also makes it easy to switch the paddle.
The bow area

The bow area


I’m planning to install portage handle on both front and rear decks. It may spoil the look, but should make portaging easier.
The acute angle of the gunwale gives the boat longitudinal rigidity, as does the cockpit rim.

I’m building in three cross cockpit thwarts (maximum under ICF regulations). One will be across the centre and the other two will be just in front of the paddlers to help get up from the seat, and of course back down again. These will be carbon fibre tubes secured with stainless steel screws. This means that they can be removed or re-positioned anywhere according the size, shape and preference of the paddlers.

Paddler positions

Paddler positions


I plan to put in flanges to support seats and footrest along the entire insides of the cockpit. This will allow maximum flexibility and comfort in terms of type of seat, height and design, plus the same with the footrests. This will allow the boat to be trimmed according to the crew.

I’m just hoping now, that the boat builder will stay focussed and crack on with the mold.